I've got two mothers. One of them is Russia.

My name's Anya, and I dedicate this blog to special and stunning, amazing and wonderful, Russia and the people of it.

Сталинград.

• Stalingrad – станция метро в Париже, Франция,
• Place de la Bataille-de-Stalingrad – площадь в Париже,
• Allee de Stalingrad – аллея в Париже,
• Place Stalingrad – название площадей во французских городах Бордо, Пюто (пригород Парижа),
• Rue de Stalingrad – название улиц во французских городах Гренобль, Лимож, Мюлуз, Париж (в том числе в департаменте Сен-Дени в составе Большого Парижа), Сартрувиль, Тулуза,
• Boulevard de Stalingrad – название бульваров во Французских городах Лион и Ницца,
• Rue de la Bataille-de-Stalingrad – улица в Нанте, Франция,
• Avenue Stalingrad / Stalingradlaan – авеню в Брюсселе, Бельгия,
• Via Stalingrado – улица в Милане, Италия.

Только в Москве, столице России нет таких названий, что не может считаться правильным и исторически справедливым.

fuckyeahvikingsandcelts:

Russian man spends 6 months living in the 10th century

Most of us like reading stories about ancient times and fantasize that our ancestors’ lives were easy and romantic, but were they really? 24-year-old Russian man Pavel Sapozhnikov decided to see what his ancestors’ lives were really like by spending 6 months living in 10th-century conditions.

“The idea is to see if a modern man can survive alone in an early medieval environment, what impact this kind of lifestyle will have on his psychological state” says Alexey Ovcharenko, who is the driving force behind the “Alone in the Past” project.

For six months – until March 22 – Pavel will live in a medieval farm without electricity, running water, Internet access and other modern comforts. The autumn and winter seasons were chosen on purpose – scientists want to explore the everyday challenges faced by medieval people during the toughest time of the year.

Thanks to fivestrings-attached for pointing this amazing photo collection to me.

(via larisaivanovna)

historyofromanovs:

Russian Imperial Palaces → The Pavlovsk Palace

Pavlovsk Palace is an 18th-century Russian Imperial residence built by Paul I of Russia in Pavlovsk, near Saint Petersburg. In 1777 The Empress Catherine II of Russia gave a parcel of a thousand hectares of forest along the winding Slavyanka River, four kilometers from her residence at Tsarskoye Selo, to her son and heir Paul I and his wife Maria Feodorovna, to celebrate the birth of their first son, the future Alexander I of Russia.

In September 1781, as construction of the Pavlovsk Palace began, Paul and Maria set off on a journey to Austria, Italy, France and Germany. Paul and Maria Feodorovna returned in November 1782, and they continued to fill Pavlovsk with art objects. The decoration of the palace was inspired by Roman models discovered at Pompeii and Herculaneum; Roman-style lamps, furniture, Roman couches, and chairs copied after those of Roman senators. Following the French taste of the time for Egyptian art, black Egyptian statues were added in the entry vestibule of the Palace.

An unpopular tsar, Paul was assassinated by conspirators in 1801. After his son’s accession to the throne, Paul’s wife made the Pavlovsk Palace her permanent home. At the time of the Russian Revolution in 1917, the eldest son of Constantine Constantinovich and his relatives were living in one of the wings of Pavlovsk. As the political situation deteriorated, they left, and the house was left to the care of Alexander Polovotsoff, director of the Art Institute and the Museum of Applied Arts in Saint Petersburg. The palace was damaged in World War II and there has been successful restoration attempts ever since, opening the new restored palace to the public today.

(via russian-empire)

russian-style:

Vladimir Solovyov by Ivan Kramskoy, 1885
And that’s my favorite Solovyov, key Russian philosopher, writer and theologian. He was close friend of Feodor Dostoevsky, and his life and views became sources for the famous characters from “The Brothers Karamazov” - Alyosha and Ivan.
Solovyov also was the founder of the “spiritual renaissance” of the Silver Age. He influenced on Andrei Beliy, Alexander Block, Nicolas Berdyaev and so on.


Russian philosophy and literature

russian-style:

Vladimir Solovyov by Ivan Kramskoy, 1885

And that’s my favorite Solovyov, key Russian philosopher, writer and theologian. He was close friend of Feodor Dostoevsky, and his life and views became sources for the famous characters from “The Brothers Karamazov” - Alyosha and Ivan.

Solovyov also was the founder of the “spiritual renaissance” of the Silver Age. He influenced on Andrei Beliy, Alexander Block, Nicolas Berdyaev and so on.

Russian philosophy and literature

(via larisaivanovna)

luminumimuni:

Carved wooden window  frames from Russia #ulyanasergeenko #inspiration #russia #loverussia #windowframes #nalichniki by ulyana_sergeenko_moscow http://ift.tt/1nKFv5h

Как же можно не любить народ, у которого такая культура?

luminumimuni:

Carved wooden window frames from Russia #ulyanasergeenko #inspiration #russia #loverussia #windowframes #nalichniki by ulyana_sergeenko_moscow http://ift.tt/1nKFv5h

Как же можно не любить народ, у которого такая культура?